DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/issn.2454-2156.IntJSciRep20204470

Seroprevalence and associated risk factors of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus and syphilis among pregnant women attending Dessie referral hospital, Northeast Ethiopia

Hussen Nuru, Negash Nurahmed, Yeabkal D. Teka, Fewzia Mohammed, Getachew Ferede, Wondwossen Abebe

Abstract


Background: Globally the burden of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and syphilis infections are a common problem of pregnant women where the complications are transmitted to their new born infants. These infections, often silent and without symptoms, can result in serious and fatal health consequences.

Methods: Cross-sectional study was conducted on 384 pregnant women attending Dessie referral hospital from February to April 2019 by using convenience sampling techniques. Data were collected by assigned nurses with face to face interview using a pre-tested questionnaire. Samples were screened by rapid serological tests for HIV and T. pallidum antibodies as well as HBsAg. Data was analysed using SPSS. Logistic regression was used to see the association between dependent and independent variables. P values <0.05 was considered as statistically significant. 

Results: The overall seroprevalence rates of HIV, HBsAg, syphilis and HIV/HBV coinfections were 6.5%, 4.7% and 0.8%, and 0.5% respectively. The history of sexual transmitted infections (STIs), multiple partners and using sharp materials were significantly associated to HIV with an adjusted odd ratio (AOR) of 8.35, 9.6 and 3.097 respectively. Likewise, the habit of ear/nose piercing and partner’s STIs exposure were associated with hepatitis B infection with an AOR 8.24 and 14.11 respectively.

Conclusions: HIV and HBV infections are still critical public health concerns among pregnant women in the study area. History of multiple sexual partners, sharing of sharp materials, history of STIs exposure, habits of ear/nose piercing were significantly associated with infections.


Keywords


HBV,HIV,Syphilis

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